Tag Archives: what I will be reading

What I Will Be Reading #31: from the Modern Mrs. Darcy

Between listening to What Should I Read Next and reading Modern Mrs. Darcy’s blog, I could keep my to-be-read list in an ever-growing state of wishing for more time. I’ll share a few of the books I’ve recently been interested in from her site.

I try not to add every book I hear Anne describe on her podcast, but she’s great at making books sound interesting. For the one-year anniversary (episode 62), Anne gathered suggestions from the listeners of what she should read next. I thought several of the books sounded good, including: Continue reading

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What I Will Be Reading #30: the YA version

I’ve got a few books to add to my reading list and Mr. Curiosity’s reading list. Miss Adventure does just fine finding her own books, but Mr. Curiosity needs a boost every once in a while. The first two books are from a GeekDad post on the best books from 2016:

Click Here to Start (A Novel) by Denis Markell looked interesting. It’s got puzzles, video games, and a bit of WWII to top things off – all things Mr. Curiosity loves.

The Urban Outlaws series by Peter Jay Black also looked interesting – young hackers and lots of adventure. What’s not to love, right!

And finally, Projekt 1065 by Alan Gratz from a post by the Young Adult Library Services Association. They are a great source of books for Mr. Curiosity since they focus exclusively on books appropriate for older kids. In this case, the book is about a spy who is a member of the Hitler Youth. Mr. Curiosity really enjoys learning about WWII, and he’s getting to the age that he can start to get more details about the horrors the Nazis inflicted on so many people. This might be a nice introduction to that topic.

Any other good books for a young teenage boy to read? Thanks for your suggestions!

If you’re interested in purchasing the book, you can click on the cover image or title to follow an Amazon affiliate link to the book and thanks for supporting my blog!

 

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What I Will Be Reading #29: Kid’s Edition

This edition of What I Will Be Reading would be more accurately described as What My Kids Will Be Reading. I’ve seen a bunch of posts of books that look like something my kids would enjoy, so I’m putting together a list for them, instead of me. Might as well get them their own “To Read” lists, right!

Let’s start with Lost on a Mountain in Maine by Donn Fedler. This a true survival story about a kid who got lost in the woods in Maine in the 1930s and how he survived his ordeal. I wasn’t aware of this book until I saw a post by The Scraped Up Kid (incidentally, a great blog about getting outside and enjoying yourself at any age, focusing on Maine trails). This book is right up our alley, and I plan to read it aloud to the kids. The story is told by Donn Fedler, who was the kid who got lost, right after his experience. If you’d prefer, there’s a graphic novel version of the story that looks awesome, but isn’t available from our library, Lost Trail: Nine Days Alone in the Wilderness, also by Donn Fedler.

Next up is Jars of Hope: How One Woman Helped Save 2,500 Children During the Holocaust by Jennifer Roy. This book was brought to my attention by A Mighty Girl’s Facebook page (which daily provides women and girls who have done impressive things and books featuring strong female characters). Again, I had never heard about Irena Sendlar and her actions during WWII, so I decided to investigate. Jars of Hope is a picture book (but with a fair amount of text on each page) that A Mighty Girl recommends for ages 7-11. If you have an older child, or want more details after reading the Jars of Hope, try Irena’s Children: Young Readers Edition; A True Story of Courage by Mary Cronk Farrell that is recommended for ages 13+.

And finally, I’m going to recommend a fiction book, Book Scavenger, by Jennifer Chambliss Bertman. This is the first book in a new series. The plot of the book is based around the Book Scavenger game. There are books hidden in various cities, and you get puzzles and clues to try to find the books first. It sounded to me like a book version of 39 Clues for a slightly older audience (since the book is almost 400 pages). Mr. Curiosity read the book and enjoyed the puzzles.

Finally, if you’re looking for more suggestions for kids, I recommend you listen to this week’s episodes of What Should I Read Next by The Modern Mrs. Darcy. Miss Adventure got about seven new books for her reading list by listening to the end of Episode 49: How to help kids fall in love with reading (with Sarah Mackenzie of Read Aloud Revival). That podcast does dangerous things to my reading list in general.

And those are the books I’m recommending my kids should read. Anything else I should add to the list?

If you’re interested in purchasing the book, you can click on the cover image or title to follow an Amazon affiliate link to the book and thanks for supporting my blog!

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What I Will Be Reading #28 – Fiction edition

I’ve got a few more books to add to my reading list. Mr. Curiosity has also expressed a desire to read more “literature” this year, so I’m on the lookout for some good reads for an eighth grader. This list won’t provide much for him, but will add several books to my reading list.

The first post that caught my eye was Five Gateway Books, published on Tor. The premise is providing a book that pulls you into a whole genre. I’ve read the gateway books for middle-grade, young adult, and dino-science fiction (although I’m going to suggest Mr. Curiosity read Jurassic Park), and I have the thriller/mystery series already on my list. The only book I’m missing is the post-apocalyptic gateway book, The Girl With All the Gifts. I really don’t need to be encouraged to post-apocalyptic books, but if this one is good enough to suck you into a whole genre, it’s worth checking out.

The next couple of books all fall into a single category – books about books. This is one of my favorite literary subgenres, and I have yet to read one I didn’t like (see my reviews of The Little Paris Bookshop or The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry for examples). The list comes from Off the Shelf and provides 11 books set in bookstores. Again, I’ve read several and have several others already on my reading list (maybe it’s a sign to move them up higher on my mental list of what to read next). The ones that newly caught my eye included The Bookstore by Deborah Meyler, The Yellow-Lighted Bookshop by Lewis Buzbee (which looks to be a nonfiction entry into this genre), and The Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafon, which I may have sitting on my bookshelf, and would give me the elusive X, Y, or Z author in my reading challenge. Check out the original post to see descriptions of each book and the full list.

And those are the new books I’m adding to my reading list. Anything else I should put on there?

If you’re interested in purchasing the book, you can click on the cover image or title to follow an Amazon affiliate link to the book and thanks for supporting my blog!

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What I Will Be Reading #27: Summer Reading edition

The Modern Mrs. Darcy put out a summer reading list of thirty books split into six different categories. I’m not going to add all thirty books to my reading list. In fact, nothing caught my fancy from the gripping, compelling, or beautifully written novels, but there were a couple of books in the other three categories that caught my fancy. I’ll link back to The Modern Mrs. Darcy’s page so you can see the descriptions of the books. I’m just going to provide my reasons for choosing those books.

From the addictive series list: Cinder – it’s steampunk YA. What’s not to love! It’s also a book I’ve seen talked about in several places, and I’m finally going to add it to my reading list.

From the engrossing books list: The Nest – another one I keep hearing this one talked about, so it’s time to actually put it on my reading list, and Before We Visit the Goddess – a multigenerational look at life in India. I’m always on the lookout for good books that focus on other cultures.

And finally, from the spellbinding stories list: Lab Girl – a science memoir, so of course I’m interested. I’ve actually gotten this one out of the library already but I had to return it unread because I ran out of time.

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What I Will Be Reading #26

I’ve picked up a new book podcast recently. I listen to a fair number of podcasts, but hadn’t found one about books. Anne Bogel from The Modern Mrs. Darcy recently started a podcast called “What Should I Read Next“. The premise behind the podcast is Anne asks her guest to provide three books they love and one book they hate, and she will then parse what kinds of books someone likes and give them three suggestions. My favorite part of the podcast is listening to her figure out the threads that tie favorite books together. It isn’t “you like suspense novels”. Instead, she figures out you like books written from a first-person point of view that exhibit a strong sense of place (or some such characteristics). I get new books from her website on a regular basis (and typically enjoy them), so I trust her judgement in suggesting books. Often, if I like the books the guest likes, I figure I have a good chance of liking the books Anne suggests. Here’s a couple of books I’ve picked up since the podcast started:

First off is Refuge: An Unnatural History of Family and Place by Terry Tempest Williams. This book is about environmental issues, breast cancer and personal reflection, which touches many topics near and dear to my heart. It’s an older book (published in 1992), but it still covers an interesting time period in American history (nuclear bomb testing in Nevada). This book was a suggestion in Episode 17.

Next up is The Post-Birthday World by Lionel Shriver. In this book, the narrator envisions her life going forward in two different paths. In one path, she cheats on her long-term boyfriend, and in the other, she doesn’t. This book was a suggestion in Episode 23.

Next, I’m adding Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel. I’ve seen this book reviewed in multiple locations and thought it sounded interesting, but it wasn’t until Episode 17 that I finally decided it was time to add it to my reading list. This is a post-apocalyptic story that bounces between the before and after the apocalypse. The main character is in a traveling Shakespeare company, determined to keep some culture alive, even after the world’s population is decimated.

Finally, in the most recent episode (#26), Anne talked about The Wild Trees: A Story of Passion and Daring by Richard Preston. The guest wasn’t so sure the book sounded interesting, but I am willing to give it a try. It’s all about trying to measure and document the ecosystems surrounding and living on ancient redwoods. As a bonus, I’ve read another of his book (The Demon in the Freezer) and found his writing style very enjoyable and engaging.

I do recommend listening to the podcast. Anne makes the books sound absolutely fascinating, even if the Amazon descriptions aren’t as intriguing.

If you’re interested in purchasing the book, you can click on the cover image or title to follow an Amazon affiliate link to the book and thanks for supporting my blog!

 

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What I Will Be Reading #25 – Middle Grade books

I’ve got some new books to add to my kids’ reading lists this time. First off are a couple of graphic novels. My kids LOVE graphic novels, so it’s a bonus when they can learn some science while reading (and rereading).

The Hub had a list of science graphic novels. Sadly, our library didn’t have many of the books (all of which looked wonderful). However, we do have a couple of the Howtoons graphic novels in the system. Specifically, Howtoons: The Possibilities Are Endless! and Howtoons: Tools of Mass Construction by Saul Griffith. The principle behind these books is to teach kids (targeted at ages 8-15) to take household items and build something cool from those items. Looks pretty cool! I hope the kids try one of the projects in the books.

Changing gears slightly (but sticking with The Hub for inspiration) is a memoir: Amazing Fantastic Incredible: A Marvelous Memoir, about Stan Lee. The post was all about books to inspire teen writers. Mr. Curiosity would be interested in this title because he’s big into comics and especially the Marvel universe. Stan Lee is a character and a half, and was influential and creating many of the comic book characters we know and love today.

And finally, a couple of books for Miss Adventure from a post at Modern Mrs. Darcy about books for tween girls. Most of the books looked great (I’ve read several, including Island of the Blue Dolphins, The Girl Who Circumnavigated Fairyland in a Ship of Her Making, and From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler), but there were two I thought for sure Miss Adventure would like. The first book in the list, Tuesdays at the Castle, by Jessica Day George, caught my eye because it mentioned it had a Hogwarts feel to the story. Miss Adventure had read the Harry Potter series multiple times, so I’m sure something similar would be right up her alley. I also thought The Lemonade War (The Lemonade War Series) by Jacqueline Davies, sounded interesting. Real world math, sibling rivalry – sounds like an interesting combination.

Should be some good books to read as we’re finishing up the school year and looking for some summer reading. Anything else in the middle grade or YA sections I should introduce to my kids?

If you’re interested in purchasing the book, you can click on the cover image or title to follow an Amazon affiliate link to the book and thanks for supporting my blog!

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