Tag Archives: vampires

Smoke and Shadows by Tanya Huff

I’m still recovering my book review buffer from the long read that was Winter of the World. So, it’s another old book review for today. This one I heard about from a podcast that is now defunct. They did an author interview with Huff and I decided to pick up one of her books from the library.

Published: 2004

Genre: urban fantasy

Length: 416 pages

Setting: Vancouver, Canada, present day Continue reading

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White Night by Jim Butcher

This is the ninth book in the Dresden Files series I’m making an effort to finish this year. There’s 15 books in the series, though, so we’ll see if I finish the series this year or not.

Published: 2007

Genre: urban fantasy

Length: 404 pages

Font: Janson

Setting: Chicago, present day, a year after the events of Proven Guilty Continue reading

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Death Masks by Jim Butcher

This is the fifth book in the Dresden Files series.

Published: 2003

Genre: urban fantasy

Length: 374 pages

Setting: Chicago, present day, soon after the events of Summer Knight Continue reading

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The Killing Dance by Laurell K. Hamilton

This is the sixth book in the Anita Blake: Vampire Hunter series.

Published: 1997

Genre: urban fantasy

Length: 387 pages

Setting: soon after the events of Bloody Bones, mostly in St. Louis Continue reading

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Bloody Bones by Laurell K. Hamilton

This is the fifth book in the Anita Blake: Vampire Hunter series. I enjoy the series enough I actually bought the books, and didn’t just get them from the library.

Published: 1996

Genre: urban fantasy

Length: 370 pages

Setting: mostly Branson, Missouri, soon after the events of The Lunatic Cafe Continue reading

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The Lunatic Cafe by Laurell K. Hamilton

This is the fourth book in the Anita Blake: Vampire Hunter series. Considering I read the previous three books in a day each, it’s not surprising I continued with the series.

Published: 1996

Genre: urban fantasy

Length: 369 pages

Setting: St. Louis, present day, a few months after the events of Circus of the Damned Continue reading

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Honey Bear by Sofia Samatar

Published: August 2012 in Clarkesworld

Genre: post-apocalyptic fantasy

Length: 13 pages

Setting: probably California, near future

Interest: It was published in the 2014 Campbellian Anthology

Summary: Karen and Dave are taking their toddler, Honey, to the ocean for the first time. There’s some indications the world isn’t quite right. For example, they have to make the hotel by a certain time so Karen’s meds don’t go off in the cooler, and a detour around a slick makes time tight. They do make it to the ocean, and are the only ones at the beach, at least until some Fair Folk show up. All the excitement of the trip, however, means that Honey voids unexpectedly. Turns out, that slick we saw was from a Fair Folk child a human family is raising, just like the family in the story. People can no longer have kids, so they raise Fair Folk kids, who are really little vampires that produce toxic waste when they void themselves.

Final thoughts: I could tell something wasn’t quite right in the family and in the world. The author slowly reveals the details of the world and how messed up it really is. It was much worse than I anticipated. If your only choice to have a child was to raise the child of an alien race that couldn’t communicate with you once it grew up, would you still do it? You really would have to want a child, that’s for sure. And what would it do to the family dynamics to have that child feeding off the mother. Is blood really any different from breast milk? Most would say yes, but is it really? What started out as a story about family dynamics turned into something much creepier. I also found the combination of a post-apocalyptic world and the fantastical elements interesting. Most post-apocalypse stories tend to the science fiction side of speculative fiction, so this was a nice change.

Title comes from: Honey Bear is what Karen calls her child.

 

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