Tag Archives: space travel

Fleet of Worlds by Larry Niven and Edward M. Lerner

I’d seen a few reviews of this book ten years ago when it first came out. It’s set in the Known Space universe, but much earlier than the other books. Ringworld is one of those series that gets talked about so much I feel like I need to at least try a few of the books.

Published: 2007

Genre: science fiction

Length: 299 pages

Setting: 200 years before Ringworld, various planets Continue reading


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From a Certain Point of View

I’m going to do something a little different for my short fiction review this week. Mr. Curiosity picked up this Stars Wars short story compilation from the library recently. I read a few stories in it and thought it would be worth reviewing.

Published: 2017

Genre: short story collection about Star Wars

Length: 496 pages

Setting: the Star Wars universe, during the time of the original movie trilogy Continue reading

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An Astronaut’s Guide to Life on Earth by Chris Hadfield

I’d seen his version of “Space Oddity” performed in space and been a fan ever since. When I found out he wrote a book, I put it on my TBR list and picked it now because it gave me a letter in my reading challenge.

Subtitle: What Going to Space Taught Me About Ingenuity, Determination, and Being Prepared for Anything

Published: 2013

Genre: memoir

Length: 284 pages of text, 295 pages total

Setting: various Canadian, U.S. and Russian locations and the International Space Station, 1980s-2000s Continue reading

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One More Star, Shining by Anthea Sharp

This is the next short story in the Event Horizon 2017 collection of short stories highlighting authors who are eligible for the 2017 Campbell award for best new writer.

Published: 2016 in the anthology Beyond the Stars: At Galaxy’s Edge

Genre: science fiction

Setting: an asteroid mining colony above the planet Doralfi, far future

Summary: Liza and her girlfriend Selina are making vacation plans  to get away from their difficult mining job. Selina heads down to the planet first and is killed in a shooting at a dance club. Liza makes plans to move away from her mining job and do something better with her life.

Final thoughts: I was amazed how much character building Sharp was able to sneak in to her story without making it feel like an infodump. I felt sorry Liza. She obviously had an easier life at one point and gave it up for a chance at agency. She’s finally found something wonderful (Selina), and that’s taken from her in a random act of violence. My favorite part was how Liza started to heal by playing music. I have also found that playing the piano and even listening to music can be very emotional, and provides a method of healing.

Title comes from: I’m not sure. Maybe it refers to Selina as being a star, shining brightly in Liza’s life?

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The Honor of the Queen by David Weber

I started this book while on vacation. I’d just read two Discworld books and needed a break (I cannot binge anything – I need variety in my life). I vaguely remember reading the first book in the series (this is the second) and thought some space opera would be a nice change of pace.

Published: 1993

Genre: space opera science fiction

Length: 435 pages

Setting: mostly the planet Grayson and its surrounding space, far future Continue reading


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Genellan: Planetfall by Scott Gier

I wanted a science fiction book to read off my Kindle while I waited for library books to come in. This one sounded reasonable and was the first in a series.

Published: 2005

Genre: science fiction

Length: 543 pages

Setting: an earth-like exoplanet called Genellan and surrounding space Continue reading

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To Touch the Sun Before It Fades by Aimee Ogden

This is the next short story in the Event Horizon 2017 collection of short stories highlighting authors who are eligible for the 2017 Campbell award for best new writer.

Published: 2016 in Persistent Visions

Genre: science fiction

Setting: Pluto, in the near future

Summary: Mariam, our narrator, is on a five-year scientific mission to Pluto. She’s left behind her husband and wife, who have had a child in her absence. She’s worried the child won’t consider her part of the family when she comes back, but doesn’t know how to put it all in words.

Final thoughts: This is the same problem that sailors used to have. They would go off on a voyage, come back, and their children wouldn’t know them. In this case, the sailor happens to be on Pluto, but it’s not a new problem she’s having. It does end on a hopeful note, with Mariam sitting down to work on a message she’ll send to her family back home.

Title comes from: The station the crew is on circles behind Pluto for six days. The night cycle is about to begin, and Mariam is reflecting on how easy it is to cover the Sun as you look at it.


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