Tag Archives: space travel

One More Star, Shining by Anthea Sharp

This is the next short story in the Event Horizon 2017 collection of short stories highlighting authors who are eligible for the 2017 Campbell award for best new writer.

Published: 2016 in the anthology Beyond the Stars: At Galaxy’s Edge

Genre: science fiction

Setting: an asteroid mining colony above the planet Doralfi, far future

Summary: Liza and her girlfriend Selina are making vacation plans  to get away from their difficult mining job. Selina heads down to the planet first and is killed in a shooting at a dance club. Liza makes plans to move away from her mining job and do something better with her life.

Final thoughts: I was amazed how much character building Sharp was able to sneak in to her story without making it feel like an infodump. I felt sorry Liza. She obviously had an easier life at one point and gave it up for a chance at agency. She’s finally found something wonderful (Selina), and that’s taken from her in a random act of violence. My favorite part was how Liza started to heal by playing music. I have also found that playing the piano and even listening to music can be very emotional, and provides a method of healing.

Title comes from: I’m not sure. Maybe it refers to Selina as being a star, shining brightly in Liza’s life?

If you’re interested in purchasing the book, you can click on the cover image or publication title to follow an Amazon affiliate link to the book and thanks for supporting my blog!

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The Honor of the Queen by David Weber

I started this book while on vacation. I’d just read two Discworld books and needed a break (I cannot binge anything – I need variety in my life). I vaguely remember reading the first book in the series (this is the second) and thought some space opera would be a nice change of pace.

Published: 1993

Genre: space opera science fiction

Length: 435 pages

Setting: mostly the planet Grayson and its surrounding space, far future Continue reading

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Genellan: Planetfall by Scott Gier

I wanted a science fiction book to read off my Kindle while I waited for library books to come in. This one sounded reasonable and was the first in a series.

Published: 2005

Genre: science fiction

Length: 543 pages

Setting: an earth-like exoplanet called Genellan and surrounding space Continue reading

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To Touch the Sun Before It Fades by Aimee Ogden

This is the next short story in the Event Horizon 2017 collection of short stories highlighting authors who are eligible for the 2017 Campbell award for best new writer.

Published: 2016 in Persistent Visions

Genre: science fiction

Setting: Pluto, in the near future

Summary: Mariam, our narrator, is on a five-year scientific mission to Pluto. She’s left behind her husband and wife, who have had a child in her absence. She’s worried the child won’t consider her part of the family when she comes back, but doesn’t know how to put it all in words.

Final thoughts: This is the same problem that sailors used to have. They would go off on a voyage, come back, and their children wouldn’t know them. In this case, the sailor happens to be on Pluto, but it’s not a new problem she’s having. It does end on a hopeful note, with Mariam sitting down to work on a message she’ll send to her family back home.

Title comes from: The station the crew is on circles behind Pluto for six days. The night cycle is about to begin, and Mariam is reflecting on how easy it is to cover the Sun as you look at it.

 

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Rubbing is Racing by Charles Payseur

This is the next short story in the Event Horizon 2017 collection of short stories highlighting authors who are eligible for the 2017 Campbell award for best new writer.

Published: June, 2015 in Lightspeed Magazine

Genre: science fiction

Setting: a doomed planet, some time in the future Continue reading

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A Handful of Dal by Naru Dames Sundar

This is the next short story in the Event Horizon 2017 collection of short stories highlighting authors who are eligible for the 2017 Campbell award for best new writer.

Published: June, 2016 in Lightspeed People of Colo(u)r Destroy Science Fiction

Genre: science fiction

Setting: a spaceship (or maybe a series of them), in the future

Summary: We follow a family that is emigrating from earth to a new planet via the perspective of the creation of dal for a special meal. We start with the original recipe from earth with lots of spices, and the elements in the recipe are slowly whittled away throughout the generations as times get hard. One member of the family finds a way off the main ship and to a new world, and the recipe slowly improves until it returns to its initial form on the new world.

Final thoughts: It’s a standard story told in a fascinating form. You can see the privations on the ship as the recipe gets more simplified. And then salvation is at hand, and the recipe improves. Many generations pass in the story, since every time a recipe is presented, there is commentary on the changes since the last recipe. Very enjoyable.

Title comes from: the recipe that was at the heart of the story started with a handful of dal

If you’re interested in purchasing the book, you can click on the cover image or title to follow an Amazon affiliate link to the book and thanks for supporting my blog!

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Recommended Science books

I like to read science nonfiction books – they feed my inner scientist. Sometimes it’s hard to pick out the really interesting books from the “you’ll only love it if you’re already a fan of the topic.” Today, I thought I’d put together a post of some of my favorite science books. All these books fall into the “fascinating” category. Be careful  – you’ll want to share random bits of information with your nearest friends and relatives.

If you click on the title, you’ll be taken to my original review. If you click on the cover photo, you’ll be taken to an Amazon page where you can buy the book yourself (and thanks for supporting my blog!).

The Disappearing Spoon: And Other True Tales of Madness, Love, and the History of the World from the Periodic Table of the Elements by Sam Kean

Here’s your first book full of tidbits. In this case, it’s all about the periodic table of the elements. You get everything from how the periodic table was put together to the discovery of elements, both natural and synthetic. My favorite part was discussing the origin of element names.

Packing for Mars: The Curious Science of Life in the Void by Mary Roach

I like pretty much every book Mary Roach has written. In this case, she’s writing about long-term stays in space. This is even more appropriate now since there are several organizations working on sending people to Mars. A trip to Mars will involve a new series of issues, and Roach discusses many of those issues in this book. She’s not afraid to discuss any bodily function, either, so don’t be surprised by the topics covered!

A Demon in the Freezer by Richard Preston

Let’s bring the books back to Earth, but still stay timely. This is the oldest book in the list, and it was inspired by the anthrax attacks in 2001. The book is all about smallpox. While smallpox has been eradicated from the wild, it still exists in at least a couple of labs and could be used to create a biological weapon if the wrong group gets a hold of it.

Feathers: The Evolution of a Natural Miracle by Thor Hanson

This is my submission for the single topic science book. You know what you’re going to get when you pick up the book – it’s all about feathers. However, the author does a great job of alternating between how birds and humans use feathers. There’s also a bit on the evolution of feathers, that probably needs an update by now, but is still interesting.

Anything sound good to you? Anything you think I should add to the list? Let me know in the comments!

If you’re interested in purchasing the book, you can click on the cover image to follow an Amazon affiliate link to the book and thanks for supporting my blog!

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