Tag Archives: read aloud

What I Will Be Reading #44: Read Alouds

The main reason I read The Read-Aloud Handbook was to get suggestions to read aloud to the kids. The book didn’t disappoint. All of these books were suggestions from The Read Aloud Handbook by Jim Trelease, seventh edition. I went through the treasury of read-alouds that ends the book and found quite a few I was interested in. I’m collecting them all here so I don’t forget about them, along with a brief description. Follow the link to an Amazon page if you’re interested in purchasing the book for yourself, and thanks for supporting my blog.

Stone Fox by John Gardiner – based on a Rocky Mountain legend about a boy who tries to save his grandfather’s farm by winning a local bobsled race

The Call of the Wild by Jack London – another dog story, but this one set in the 1903 Klondike gold rush

Claudette Colvin: Twice Toward Justice by Phillip Hoose – a Civil Rights era story that Miss Adventure could read on her own

The Girl with the Silver Eyes by Willo Davis Roberts – a paranormal suspense story

The Great Turkey Walk by Kathleen Karr – a humorous story about herding turkeys in the Kansas Territory in the 1860s

The Mighty Miss Malone by Christopher Paul Curtis – this sounds like a companion to Bud, Not Buddy, which I enjoyed reading to the kids years ago. It’s the story of a black family during the Great Depression of the 1930s. Trelease recommends watching the PBS special Riding the Rails to go along with the book.

My Brother Sam Is Dead by James Lincoln Collier and Christopher Collier – an American Revolutionary War story set in Connecticut

Otto of the Silver Hand by Howard Pyle – a classic written in 1888 set in warring medieval German tribes – I’m sure this one is available via gutenberg.org

Sarah Bishop by Scott O’Dell – another American Revolutionary War story, but this time focusing on a girl who runs away from the conflict to live in the wilderness

The True Confessions of Charlotte Doyle by Avi – about a girl on a merchant ship sailing from England to the U.S. in 1932

Read All About It!: Great Read-Aloud Stories, Poems, and Newspaper Pieces for Preteens and Teens by Jim Trelease – a collection of short fiction and nonfiction work that is appropriate for teens and tweens

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The Read-Aloud Handbook by Jim Trelease

I think I saw this book in the library catalog when I was looking for something else. I’m always on the lookout for a good read-aloud, so I had to check out the book.

Published: originally in 1979, but I read the seventh edition, published in 2013. There is now an eighth edition, published in 2019

Genre: nonfiction

Length: 172 pages of text, 351 pages when you include the treasury of read-alouds, notes, and indices

Summary: Short version: Why reading aloud is great for everyone and some suggested books Continue reading

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Out of My Mind by Sharon Draper

It was recommended by The Modern Mrs. Darcy as a diverse books read and a good read aloud if you like Wonder. We did, so I thought I’d read it to the kids as a contrast to our last book.

Published: 2010

Genre: middle grade fiction

Length: 295 pages

Setting: somewhere about a six hour drove from Washington, D.C., recent past (when MySpace was still a thing)

Summary: Short version: Melody’s life with cerebral palsy changes when she gets a communication computer Continue reading

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I, Juan de Pareja by Elizabeth Borton de Trevino

I needed one last read aloud for the school year and went to peruse the Newbery Award winners shelves at our local library. I chose this one because it was set in a country other than the U.S. and fir out medieval time period we’ve been studying.

Published: 1965

Genre: middle grade historical fiction

Length: 180 pages

Setting: Spain and Italy, ~1610-1670

Summary: Short version: We follow the life of Juan, slave to the Spanish painter Diego Valezquez Continue reading

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The Thief by Megan Whalen Turner

This was one of the School Library Journal’s top 25 chapter books that we haven’t read. I finally got around to it, two years after adding it to my reading list.

Published: 1996

Genre: middle grade fantasy

Length: 219 pages

Setting: medieval countries of Sounis, Attolia, and Eddis that felt like Greece

Summary: Short version: Gen really is good enough to steal Hamiathes’s Gift Continue reading

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Inside Out and Back Again by Thanhha Lai

I’m not exactly sure how this book got put on my “read to the kids” list. I’m sure it had something to do with being a book in verse. It was our first read aloud book for the school year, mainly because it was available as an ebook. I had chosen a different book, but Mr. Curiosity went and read it the weekend before I was going to start reading it aloud, so I needed a quick backup without being able to go to the library.

Published: 2011

Genre: middle grade historical fiction book in verse

Length: 272 pages

Setting: Vietnam and Alabama, 1975

Summary: Short version: Immigrant story from the Vietnam War Continue reading

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Brave New World by Aldous Huxley

I know Monday is usually a review of short fiction, but I’m in the middle of five different books right now (a read aloud with the kids, the audiobook we started and didn’t finish on our trip to the outskirts of Philly this weekend for a gymnastics meet, a book Mr. Curiosity and I are reading together for school, and two books for my pleasure because I couldn’t help starting the second one) and I just can’t manage to add another to the mix without my brain exploding. So, another book review it is.

For our last read aloud, Mr. Curiosity requested a science fiction book. I actually had a hard time coming up with something that was the right length (I like novella length so the book doesn’t take forever to finish) and something I wanted to read to the kids. After looking through a bunch of recommendations, I settled on this classic. It’s something I read in high school, but remember very little of (beyond things like “Ending is better than Mending”).

Published: 1932

Genre: science fiction

Length: 152 pages

Setting: near future London

Summary: Short version: In the future, we consume, not think. Continue reading

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