Tag Archives: magic

Wolf Speaker by Tamora Pierce

This is the second book in the Immortals series, that started with Wild Magic. Miss Adventure downloaded the audiobook and played it for me on the way to gymnastics practices. I ended up finishing it on my own.

Published: 1994

Genre: YA fantasy

Length: 182 pages

Setting: the province of Dunlath within Tortall, soon after the events of Wild Magic Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under Book review

The Penitent Damned by Django Wexler

This is the next story included in the 2014 Campbellian Anthology. There’s only one author left to read on the anthology. Luckily, I found a 2017 collection of authors eligible for the 2017 Campbell Award for New Writers. It’s only available until July 17, 2017, so download it today if you’re interested.

Published: June, 2013 on io9, and you can also find it on Amazon

Genre: fantasy

Length: 20 pages

Setting: Vordan, a fantastical, medieval-style city Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under Book review

Carry On by Rainbow Rowell

This is a book Cath from Fangirl refers to as her favorite series. It may be the book Cath is writing, or it may be canon from the series, but ultimately, it’s Rowell’s take on the characters Cath obsesses over in Fangirl.

Published: 2015

Genre: YA urban fantasy

Length: 522 pages

Setting: mostly in and around the Watford school for Magicians in England, present day Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under Book review

Half Magic by Edgar Eager

This was recommended several places, including Gretchen Rubin’s list of 81 favorite kids books, as an excellent read aloud or book for kids. We needed a new read aloud, and the library had it as an e-book, so I wouldn’t have to worry about finishing it before it was due back.

Published: 1954

Genre: intrusive fantasy

Length: 192 pages

Setting: Toledo, Ohio, 1950s Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under Book review

Collateral Memory by Sabrina Vourvoulias

This is the next story included in the 2014 Campbellian Anthology.

Published: June, 2013 in Strange Horizons (you can also listen to the story from their podcast)

Genre: magical realism

Setting: mostly Guatemala, 1980s

Summary: The narrator recounts a childhood game where the girls (and some boys) would hide in a shed and another group of boys would find them and drag them outside, fighting the whole time, where they were disappeared. The girls would win if the boys didn’t find them all, but the only time they won was when the narrator used magic to hide one of the boys. It seems the kids were re-enacting scenes from when soldiers would enter their houses and grab anyone they wanted.

Final thoughts: the story felt like it was supposed to be portentous and meaningful, but I just didn’t get it. Maybe because I grew up safe and didn’t have to worry about soldiers breaking into my house in the middle of the night and raping or killing a family member or myself. The children’s game reflected the life they were living, with some variation if you were a native Guatemalan or an American missionary or soldier’s kid. There was also a bit of magic thrown in because the narrator was able to pull darkness in around herself or others, but that was a tiny part of the story.

Title comes from: It came from the last lines of the story. “Call it a game. Call it collateral memory. Call it real.”

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Book review

White Night by Jim Butcher

This is the ninth book in the Dresden Files series I’m making an effort to finish this year. There’s 15 books in the series, though, so we’ll see if I finish the series this year or not.

Published: 2007

Genre: urban fantasy

Length: 404 pages

Font: Janson

Setting: Chicago, present day, a year after the events of Proven Guilty Continue reading

1 Comment

Filed under Book review

Death Masks by Jim Butcher

This is the fifth book in the Dresden Files series.

Published: 2003

Genre: urban fantasy

Length: 374 pages

Setting: Chicago, present day, soon after the events of Summer Knight Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under Book review