Tag Archives: humor

Space Opera by Catherynne M. Valente

Wandering Scientist described as a cross between Douglas Adams and Eurovision so I was in, especially when I found it to listen to on Hoopla.

Published: 2018

Genre: science fiction

Length: 352 pages

Setting: near future Earth and beyond

Summary: Short version: Humans join the rest of the galaxy in competing in the Metagalactic Grand Prix Continue reading

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Men at Arms by Terry Pratchett

It’s the next (and 15th) Discworld book and readily available on my Kindle.

Published: 1993

Genre: fantasy

Length: 377 pages

Setting: Ankh-Morpork on Discworld

Summary: Short version: A stolen gun leads to unrest in Ankh-Morpork Continue reading

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Dear Bob and Sue by Matt and Karen Smith

This book was recommended to me on postcrossing because of my interest in national parks.

Published: 2012

Genre: nonfiction travel memoir

Length: 313 pages

Setting: various locations around the U.S., 2010-2012

Summary: Short version: As the text on the cover says: One couple’s journey through the national parks Continue reading

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Lords and Ladies by Terry Pratchett

This is the 14th and next Discworld book, following Small Gods in publication order but Witches Abroad in plot. I needed something I knew I would enjoy that was light and funny and available. Discworld books fit the bill for me.

Published: 1992

Genre: fantasy

Length: 400 pages

Setting: Lancre on Discworld, after the events of Witches Abroad

Summary: Short version: Elves try to invade Lancre but the witches stop them Continue reading

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After You by Jojo Moyes

This was my February’s book club choice. We read the first book, Me Before You, a few years ago. We decided to see how Moyes finished up the series.

Published: 2015

Genre: fiction

Length: 352 pages

Setting: London, 2010s. a few years after the events of Me Before You

Summary: Short version: Louisa has a hard time moving on from Will’s death Continue reading

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Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman

I desperately needed a book at the airport. We were flying to New Orleans and I had left my Kindle at home accidentally. There was no way I was going to make it that long without a book. Off to the airport bookstore I went. I picked up this book because I had heard The Modern Mrs. Darcy talk about it. I needed to pick something I wouldn’t be disappointed in since it was all I would have for a few hours. Luckily, I made a good choice.

Published: 2017

Genre: fiction

Length: 390 pages

Setting: Glasgow, Scotland, in the last decade

Font: Sabon LT Std and Bulmer

Summary: Short version: Eleanor’s life improves when she becomes friends with Raymond Continue reading

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What I Will Be Reading #44: Read Alouds

The main reason I read The Read-Aloud Handbook was to get suggestions to read aloud to the kids. The book didn’t disappoint. All of these books were suggestions from The Read Aloud Handbook by Jim Trelease, seventh edition. I went through the treasury of read-alouds that ends the book and found quite a few I was interested in. I’m collecting them all here so I don’t forget about them, along with a brief description. Follow the link to an Amazon page if you’re interested in purchasing the book for yourself, and thanks for supporting my blog.

Stone Fox by John Gardiner – based on a Rocky Mountain legend about a boy who tries to save his grandfather’s farm by winning a local bobsled race

The Call of the Wild by Jack London – another dog story, but this one set in the 1903 Klondike gold rush

Claudette Colvin: Twice Toward Justice by Phillip Hoose – a Civil Rights era story that Miss Adventure could read on her own

The Girl with the Silver Eyes by Willo Davis Roberts – a paranormal suspense story

The Great Turkey Walk by Kathleen Karr – a humorous story about herding turkeys in the Kansas Territory in the 1860s

The Mighty Miss Malone by Christopher Paul Curtis – this sounds like a companion to Bud, Not Buddy, which I enjoyed reading to the kids years ago. It’s the story of a black family during the Great Depression of the 1930s. Trelease recommends watching the PBS special Riding the Rails to go along with the book.

My Brother Sam Is Dead by James Lincoln Collier and Christopher Collier – an American Revolutionary War story set in Connecticut

Otto of the Silver Hand by Howard Pyle – a classic written in 1888 set in warring medieval German tribes – I’m sure this one is available via gutenberg.org

Sarah Bishop by Scott O’Dell – another American Revolutionary War story, but this time focusing on a girl who runs away from the conflict to live in the wilderness

The True Confessions of Charlotte Doyle by Avi – about a girl on a merchant ship sailing from England to the U.S. in 1932

Read All About It!: Great Read-Aloud Stories, Poems, and Newspaper Pieces for Preteens and Teens by Jim Trelease – a collection of short fiction and nonfiction work that is appropriate for teens and tweens

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