Tag Archives: highly recommended

Here’s the Deal by Micah Edwards

This is Edwards’ second book. I highly enjoyed his first, Okay, So Look, and was thrilled to see he was continuing his retelling of the Bible with Exodus. I received a free copy of the book to review, but all of my opinions are my own.

Subtitle: A Humorous Retelling of the Book of Exodus (Bible: Faster, Funnier)

Published: 2018 (it comes out officially tomorrow)

Genre: religion novella

Length: 136 pages

Setting: Egypt and its surrounding areas, during the time of the Pharaohs

Summary: Short version: just look at the subtitle Continue reading

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Skin Game by Jim Butcher

This is the 15th book in the Dresden Files, and the last book in the series currently published. I’m excited to have finally finished the series, but sad not to have any more books to read until Butcher publishes some new ones.

Published: 2014

Genre: urban fantasy

Length: 454 pages

Setting: Chicago, one year after Cold Days

Summary: Short version: Harry has to outwit the Denarian Nicodemus Continue reading

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Tattoo by Michelle Rene

I was given a copy of this novella to review (although my views are my own). It’s published by Annorlunda Enterprises, a small-press publisher that focuses on stories that make you think.

Published: 2018 (today is the release day, in fact!)

Genre: maybe post-apocalyptic fiction? It was Judgement Day that happened, not the apocalypse, but it changed everything

Length: 152 pages

Setting: a generic city, near future Continue reading

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Thunderhead by Neal Shusterman

This is the second book in the Arc of a Scythe series that both Mr. Curiosity and I were thrilled to see at the library. He recognized the scythes on the cover. I recognized the font. We immediately had an argument over who would get to read the book first.

Published: 2018

Genre: science fiction

Length: 504 pages

Font: Bembo Std.

Setting: mostly MidMerica, soon after the events of Scythe Continue reading

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The Tea Dragon Society by Katie O’Neill

I’m not sure how this title came to my attention, but being both a tea lover and a dragon lover, I knew as soon as I saw the title that I would have to get the book.

Published: 2017

Genre: middle grade fantasy graphic novel

Length: 72 pages

Setting: a small town in a newly industrializing society (based on the fact the characters lament people don’t have time for the traditional things like swords anymore) Continue reading

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Best and Worst of 2017

One last post to look back on 2017 and I’ll be ready to post new book reviews. Let’s start with my favorite books of the year. I’ll group them by genre to give them a bit of focus and link to my original review:

Fiction:

The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society was a book club choice and a reread for me. I loved it just as much the second time as I did the first. Beware the epistolary nature of the book.

Mr. Penumbra’s 24-Hour Bookstore. I’m a sucker for books about bookstores, and this book didn’t disappoint.

Science fiction/fantasy:

The Three-Body Problem was some hard science fiction set in China that dealt with first contact with aliens. That reminds me – I want to finish that series this year as well.

Norse Mythology was a beautiful retelling of the Norse myths just begging to be read aloud or consumed via audiobook.

Station Eleven was a lovely addition to the post-apocalyptic oeuvre. Almost everyone has died of a virus, but we still need entertainment. We follow a traveling theater group around on their wanderings.

YA:

Scythe was set in a world where death had been conquered, but people still needed to die. A job was created to kill a portion of humanity on a regular basis, and what happens when you give people that kind of power? The next book in the series is coming out this year, and I need to pick that one up as well, for me and Mr. Curiosity.

I devoured Carry On and then made Mr. Curiosity read it. Miss Adventure has even read it several times. A slightly more mature version of Harry Potter that I didn’t get annoyed at the adults as much when reading.

Middle grade:

Tuesdays at the Castle was a fun read about a young girl that had to save her royal family, with the help of a half-sentient castle.

Wonder was just as good as I’ve heard, and made me cry while I was reading it to my kids. I can’t wait to see the movie.

Stella by Starlight was a beautiful description of how racism can affect black families, while still being hopeful so it’s perfect for tweens.

The Hammer of Thor was the second book in the Magnus Chase series that focuses on Norse mythology. The third book came out at the end of the year without me realizing it, so I’ll be finishing that series this year as well.

Graphic novel:

Ghosts was a story about not being afraid, while adding diversity to graphic novels with a character with a chronic disease (cystic fibrosis) and a celebration of the Day of the Dead. Perhaps something to read after watching Coco.

March: Book One, Two and Three. This is a bit of a cop-out since I read the first book the previous year, but I love the whole series. If you want to read about the Civil Rights movement and are too old for Stella by Starlight, read this graphic novel series.

And now for the worst books of the year. Again, I did pretty well and only had three books I didn’t finish:

A Light Between Oceans was a book club choice and I just couldn’t get into it. I even read 150 pages (when I usually only give 50) and I just didn’t care to finish. I’m not even sure why I didn’t like the book because on the surface, it seemed right up my alley.

Sleipnir was boring military fiction, which I didn’t think was possible to write. The author probably tried to be too realistic for the soldiering since it was a lot of standing around doing nothing.

Bridget Jones’ Diary was a bit too much in the lines of a woman’s magazine, focusing on losing weight and getting a man. Not my cup of tea at all.

Overall, not a bad reading year. I’m hoping I can find more good stuff to read this year!

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The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society by Mary Ann Shaffer and Annie Borrows

This was our book club choice for October. Many of us had read it already (it’s really hard to find a book that 1/3 of us haven’t read. That’s what you get for having a group of dedicated readers in a book club), but we had never done it as a book club book. The library had enough copies so we decided to read it again.

Published: 2008

Genre: fiction

Length: 274 pages

Setting: London and Guernsey, just after WWII Continue reading

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