Tag Archives: female protagonist

Anne of Green Gables: A Graphic Novel adapted by Mariah Mardsen

When I saw somewhere there was a graphic novel version of Anne of Green Gables, I had to get it immediately from my library. It’s one of my favorites, and I’m happy to consume it in different versions.

Illustrator: Brenna Thummler

Published: 2017

Genre: middle grade fiction graphic novel

Length: 230 pages

Setting: the town of Avonlea on Prince Edward Island, Canada, early 1900s

Summary: Short version: Orphan Anne growing up in Avonlea Continue reading

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Hyrmnal by Jonathan Laidlow

This is the next short story in the Event Horizon 2017 collection of short stories highlighting authors who are eligible for the 2017 Campbell award for best new writer.

Published: August, 2016 in Daily Science Fiction (you can read it for free at that link)

Genre: science fiction

Setting: another planet, far future

Summary: Coryde is a snail player stuck in the outer planet circuit. After her performance, she’s approached by a guy who asks her out for a drink. She agrees, just to be close to someone. Turns out, he’s part of the Mollusc Liberation Front and he’s letting her snail free so she can no longer her it.

Final thoughts: An interesting concept, playing the snail. Laidlow explains the process, which involves paralyzing snail venom and singing into the mouth of the snail so its body and shell can enhance the sound. Sounds kind of gross, and I can see why a liberation society would develop. Of course, just letting a snail go in a random wild area will likely lead to its death, but it won’t be hurt by people anymore. Just eaten by the local predator or dried to a crisp in the baking sun. People on a mission don’t think about reality like that, though.

Title comes from: Snails are hermaphroditic and the guy uses the pronoun “hyrm” for the snail. Since there’s singing involved, Laidlow made a play on hyrm and hymnal for the title

 

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Provenance by Ann Leckie

I loved her Imperial Radch series, so this was a given to read. I happened to see it sitting out at the library and picked it up as a palate cleanser after reading The Woman in White.

Published: 2017

Genre: science fiction

Length: 439 pages

Setting: mostly near the stations or planets of Tyr and Hwae, after the events of the Imperial Radch trilogy

Summary: Short version: Ingray is at the center of interspecies political wrangling Continue reading

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Skills to Keep the Devil in His Place by Lia Swope Mitchell

This is the next short story in the Event Horizon 2017 collection of short stories highlighting authors who are eligible for the 2017 Campbell award for best new writer.

Published: in Shimmer Magazine (check it out – it’s got some lovely fonts)

Genre: fantasy

Setting: generic high school, present day

Summary: Rachel can see the devil, and she doesn’t know what to do about that. He dances around, trying to get her attention so he can do more evil. She lists the actions she’s taking to try to ignore him, but it isn’t working. Another high school students, Julie, can also see the devil. Julie has figured out how to placate the devil. He sucks the evil right out of her, and she can show Rachel how to do it as well. Rachel figures out that the devil is taking something vital from them, and comes up with a plan to stop him.

Final thoughts: I liked the format of the story. It’s set up in sections that describe Rachel’s plan of attack. Of course, some of those plans are more successful than others. I did find it amusing that Rachel was going to talk to Julie about whether or not she noticed the devil, but Julie seemed too perfect to have problems with him. That was just because Julie had figured out how to keep him under a bit of control. Of course, you can’t really control the devil. Rachel was the first to realize their situation couldn’t continue and made an effort to change things up.

Title comes from: It describes the sections of the story and the overarching story line

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In Real Life by Cory Doctorow

I read part of this graphic novel when it came out. We were on vacation and chilling at a library one day. It took me this long to actually finish the book (I reread the whole thing since it had been so long). Besides, I find Doctorow’s writing challenging and it always makes me think.

Artist: Jen Wang

Published: 2014

Genre: fiction graphic novel

Length: 174 pages

Setting: a generic town and the MMORPG Coarsegold Online

Summary: Short version: A quick lesson in in-game economics Continue reading

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Squalor and Sympathy by Matt Dovey

This is the next short story in the Event Horizon 2017 collection of short stories highlighting authors who are eligible for the 2017 Campbell award for best new writer.

Published: May 2016 in Writers of the Future Vol 32; it was also a PodCastle episode, if you prefer to listen to your short fiction

Genre: steampunk fantasy

Setting: Victorian England with magic

Summary: Short version: The Industrial Revolution driven by need-based magic Continue reading

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Aru Shah and the End of Time by Roshani Chokshi

I saw a blurb by Rick Riordan saying this was written in his style, but with Hindu mythology. Count me (and Miss Adventure) in!

Published: 2018

Genre: middle grade urban fantasy

Length: 343 pages of text, 355 pages with the glossary (that you should totally read because it’s just as funny as the book)

Setting: Savannah Georgia, and various Hindu Otherworld locations

Summary: Short version: Aru first imperils and then saves the world from the Sleeper Continue reading

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