Tag Archives: aliens

A Talent for War by Jack McDevitt

This book has been on my TBR list so long I can’t remember why I added it. I read it now because it was available as an ebook to take on vacation.

Published: 1989

Genre: science fiction

Length: 310 pages

Setting: various places within the Confederacy of Worlds, far future

Summary: Short version: Alex unravels a historical mystery Continue reading

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Provenance by Ann Leckie

I loved her Imperial Radch series, so this was a given to read. I happened to see it sitting out at the library and picked it up as a palate cleanser after reading The Woman in White.

Published: 2017

Genre: science fiction

Length: 439 pages

Setting: mostly near the stations or planets of Tyr and Hwae, after the events of the Imperial Radch trilogy

Summary: Short version: Ingray is at the center of interspecies political wrangling Continue reading

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A Human’s Life by George Nikolopoulos

This week promised to be the regular kind of busy instead of the crazy kind of busy, so I’m back to my usual blog posting schedule. As such, today’s post is the next short story in the Event Horizon 2017 collection of short stories highlighting authors who are eligible for the 2017 Campbell award for best new writer.

Published: September, 2016 in Galaxy’s Edge: Issue 22. It’s was also featured on an episode of StarShipSofa, if you prefer to listen to your short fiction as I do.

Genre: science fiction

Setting: the planet Pandaesia, far future

Summary: Short version: An alien’s guide to owning a human Continue reading

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Fleet of Worlds by Larry Niven and Edward M. Lerner

I’d seen a few reviews of this book ten years ago when it first came out. It’s set in the Known Space universe, but much earlier than the other books. Ringworld is one of those series that gets talked about so much I feel like I need to at least try a few of the books.

Published: 2007

Genre: science fiction

Length: 299 pages

Setting: 200 years before Ringworld, various planets Continue reading

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Twiceborn by C. L. Kagmi

Now that I’ve finally written up all of my 2017 books, I’m back to my usual schedule. I’ll get a post about my 2018 reading goals up soon, but Monday means short fiction. I’m still working my way through Event Horizon 2017, so this is the next short story in the collection highlighting authors who are eligible for the 2017 Campbell award for best new writer.

Published: September, 2016 in Compelling Science Fiction Issue 2

Genre: science fiction

Setting: the exoplanet Bharata, far future Continue reading

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Mutineer’s Moon by David Weber

For my last book of the year, I decided I was in the mood for some science fiction. I picked a random Baen book off my Kindle based on a title I was pretty sure would be scifi instead of fantasy.

Published: 1991

Genre: science fiction

Length: 320 pages

Setting: the Earth, near future Continue reading

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Choices, in Sequential Order by Karlo Yeager Rodriguez

This is the next short story in the Event Horizon 2017 collection of short stories highlighting authors who are eligible for the 2017 Campbell award for best new writer.

Published: April, 2016 in Nature

Genre: science fiction

Setting: Earth, 2300s

Summary: An alien xenobiologist has come to Earth and been turned into a snack for scorpion babies. The xenobiologist is rambling to the creature as it prepares the narrator for eating by the scorpion babies. At the same time, the xenobiologist’s suit is running a diagnostic to determine what kind of creature attacked.

Final thoughts: An interesting contrast between the dichotomous key trying to identify the Earth creature and the reminiscing the narrator is doing. They know they are going to die, but are still fascinated by the creature, fully acknowledging that the fascination may be a product of some kind of venom. It takes longer for the suit to realize the Earth creature is dangerous than for the narrator to know that, since they are paralyzed and can tell the suit is damaged.

As an aside, I’m always surprised when I see a science fiction story printed in Nature since it is a big name science publication. But, this is a science-heavy story so I guess it fits.

Title comes from: The action is set against a set of questions designed to identify the Earth creature

 

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