Category Archives: Library books

What I Will Be Reading #44: Read Alouds

The main reason I read The Read-Aloud Handbook was to get suggestions to read aloud to the kids. The book didn’t disappoint. All of these books were suggestions from The Read Aloud Handbook by Jim Trelease, seventh edition. I went through the treasury of read-alouds that ends the book and found quite a few I was interested in. I’m collecting them all here so I don’t forget about them, along with a brief description. Follow the link to an Amazon page if you’re interested in purchasing the book for yourself, and thanks for supporting my blog.

Stone Fox by John Gardiner – based on a Rocky Mountain legend about a boy who tries to save his grandfather’s farm by winning a local bobsled race

The Call of the Wild by Jack London – another dog story, but this one set in the 1903 Klondike gold rush

Claudette Colvin: Twice Toward Justice by Phillip Hoose – a Civil Rights era story that Miss Adventure could read on her own

The Girl with the Silver Eyes by Willo Davis Roberts – a paranormal suspense story

The Great Turkey Walk by Kathleen Karr – a humorous story about herding turkeys in the Kansas Territory in the 1860s

The Mighty Miss Malone by Christopher Paul Curtis – this sounds like a companion to Bud, Not Buddy, which I enjoyed reading to the kids years ago. It’s the story of a black family during the Great Depression of the 1930s. Trelease recommends watching the PBS special Riding the Rails to go along with the book.

My Brother Sam Is Dead by James Lincoln Collier and Christopher Collier – an American Revolutionary War story set in Connecticut

Otto of the Silver Hand by Howard Pyle – a classic written in 1888 set in warring medieval German tribes – I’m sure this one is available via gutenberg.org

Sarah Bishop by Scott O’Dell – another American Revolutionary War story, but this time focusing on a girl who runs away from the conflict to live in the wilderness

The True Confessions of Charlotte Doyle by Avi – about a girl on a merchant ship sailing from England to the U.S. in 1932

Read All About It!: Great Read-Aloud Stories, Poems, and Newspaper Pieces for Preteens and Teens by Jim Trelease – a collection of short fiction and nonfiction work that is appropriate for teens and tweens

Leave a comment

Filed under Book recommendation, Library books

The Door in the Wall by Marguerite de Angeli

This is a Newbery Award winning book that we own. I thought it might make an enjoyable read aloud.

Published: 1949

Genre: middle grade historical fiction

Length: 121 pages

Setting: medieval England

Summary: Short version: Robin gets sick and recovers with the monks Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under Library books

What I Will Be Reading #36: It’s Been a While

It’s been a while since I’ve had a What I Will Be Reading post. Trying to homeschool on top of teaching a 70+ person class AND a lab (even if it only has 11 students in it) has been a bit too much for my brain. But, I don’t have much grading to do today so I thought I’d add some books to my reading list.

Let’s start with a couple of suggestions from The Modern Mrs. Darcy. Let’s face it, I could basically populate my reading list with books she writes about, but I’m going to try to branch out a bit.

Miss Adventure is nearly a teenager, which makes Untangled: Guiding Teenage Girls Through the Seven Transitions into Adulthood by Lisa Damour highly appropriate. This book came from a post about books to help you navigate the tween and teen years. As an extra added bonus, it provides that elusive “U” for my Title Alphabet Challenge.

My second book from The Modern Mrs. Darcy is another nonfiction book. This time, though, it’s a book about books – my favorite. The book is called Dear Fahrenheit 451: Love and Heartbreak in the Stacks: A Librarian’s Love Letters and Breakup Notes to the Books in Her Life by Annie Spence.

My next book is a suggestion from my mother-in-law. She reads quite a bit and besides having a stronger taste for mysteries than I do, has a similar taste in books. If she suggests a book, I’m likely to enjoy it. She’s suggested I read The Tea Girl of Hummingbird Lane by Lisa See. A major thread of the story is about growing and picking tea. I’m a tea drinker, not a coffee drinker, so I think this will be interesting to read.

Finally, a science fiction book to round out my books for the day: Six Wakes by Mur Lafferty. I’m a long time fan of Mur, ever since she started her Heaven series (which is still available to listen to on Scribl for free). Six Wakes is her new novel and it is nominated for a Hugo Award this year. It’s a murder mystery in space. Who has killed the entire crew? The clones don’t know, since they’ve just been woken and everyone is dead.

So, any books look good to you? What else should I add to my book list?

If you’re interested in purchasing the book, you can click on the cover image or title to follow an Amazon affiliate link to the book and thanks for supporting my blog!

Leave a comment

Filed under Library books

What I Will Be Reading #34: Something For Everyone

I’ve got new books to add to all the reading lists this week. Let’s start with my books. Unbound Worlds had two posts about books to read from different decades, the 1980s and the 1990s. I pretty much want to read any series from the lists I haven’t read yet. For the 1980s, I’ve only read Dragon Prince by Melanie Rawn (in fact, I happen to own the book). I have started the Belgariad series, starting with Pawn and Prophecy, by David Eddings. I think the same week I saw this post, my friend strongly recommended the book. I’ve read quite a few of the 1990s recommendations, although most of them I haven’t read in over a decade. We’ll see if I revisit any of them for my next reread challenge.

A book for me and Mr, Curiosity is Any Weir’s new book, Artemis. I loved The Martian so much, I’d pretty much read anything by him, but the Penguin Random House newsletter that brought the book to my attention described it as a heist story set on the moon. Yes please! By the way, if you follow that link before October 10th, you can be entered into a sweepstakes to win a bunch of books from NYC Comic Con, including this one.

And for Miss Adventure (but I’m pretty sure Mr. Curiosity and I would enjoy the books as well), I’ve got The Shadow Thieves by Anne Ursu, the first book in the Cronus Chronicles. This is a Greek mythology/Percy Jackson read-alike. With as much as we all enjoy the Percy Jackson series, another book full of Greek mythology is always a safe bet. A post on Lifehacker about how to get boys to read girls’ books brought this to my attention.

So, how do the books look to you? Anything else I should put on my reading list or share with my kids?

If you’re interested in purchasing the book, you can click on the cover image or title to follow an Amazon affiliate link to the book and thanks for supporting my blog!

Leave a comment

Filed under Library books

What I Will Be Reading #32: Keep Them Coming

I’ve been working down my reading list, but I always manage to add books faster than I take them off. Here’s some new ones I’ve got:

GeekDad is always a good source of books. They had a post recently about space opera series. Just what I need, more series to read, but I do so love a good space opera. I’ve already read the Old Man’s War series, so that cuts six books off the list. I’m most intrigued by the Lost Fleet Series by Jack Campbell, starting with Dauntless, and the Antares series by Michael McCollum, starting with Antares Dawn.

My other big source for books is the Modern Mrs. Darcy. I’ve got two from her this time. I’m in the planning stages for a new year of homeschooling, so my attention went right to The Well-Educated Mind: A Guide to the Classical Education You Never Had by Susan Wise Bauer and Jessie Wise in her post on Books About Books. It’s been on my radar before, but I never got around to it. This time, I requested it right away from the library and I’m reading it right now. It’s quite interesting and I’m thinking about changing things up for homeschooling this year. We’ll see. The other book came from episode 83 of her podcast, and is called How to Read Literature Like a Professor: A Lively and Entertaining Guide to Reading Between the Lines by Thomas Foster. Mr. Curiosity is at the high school level, and I’d like to be able to discuss some literature with him. I’m terrible at finding symbolism or themes or anything like that from books, so I’m hoping this book will help.

My final book addition is more of an author addition, and he’s also useful for homeschooling. I’m always on the lookout for Fun Math activities, and nicoleandmaggie posted some details on how to keep a gifted kid challenged. In that post, they mentioned puzzle books by Martin Gardner. He’s published a number of books, and they should provide me some inspiration for the year!

And those are the books I’m adding to my reading list. Anything look good to you?

If you’re interested in purchasing the book, you can click on the cover image or title to follow an Amazon affiliate link to the book and thanks for supporting my blog!

1 Comment

Filed under Homeschooling, Library books

Weekly Wrap-Up: Science Overview Books

My daughter’s gymnastics team is hosting a meet this weekend (Stars and Stripes, a big meet with 1800+ competitors over four days), so I’ve been busy at the convention center all weekend. Team parents are expected to work a couple of sessions to help the whole thing run smoothly. I still have time to review a couple of books, though. I found two interesting science books I want to talk about today:

Let me start with the more general book, The Science Book (Big Ideas Simply Explained) published by DK. DK does some great overview books, so I’m not surprised they are the publisher. This also seems to be one of a series of books focusing on big ideas simply explained (I need to get The Politics Book next for Mr. Curiosity). The book is organized chronologically and for each major scientific breakthrough, you see the chain of observations that lead to the conclusion, what people thought before and after the breakthrough, a biography about the scientist, and some explanatory information. The book has great graphics and is designed for minimal scientific knowledge. It certainly would be an asset to a homeschooling library.

The second book is BODY: A Graphic Guide to Us by Steve Parker and Andrew Baker. As you would expect from the name, each page is a large graphic about a part of the body. The book walks you through the different organ systems and explains how they work with simple graphics. I would just flip open to a page and immediately be drawn into fascinating little details about the body. Miss Adventure spent the entire drive home from the library going, “huh” and then having to read me some tidbit. Be aware that this was published in the UK, so there are some alternate spellings (oesophagus, for example) and the measurements are all in metric.

And those are the new books we flipped through in school this week. Joining up with Weird, Unsocialized Homeschoolers.

If you’re interested in purchasing the book, you can click on the cover image or title to follow an Amazon affiliate link to the book and thanks for supporting my blog!

Leave a comment

Filed under Homeschooling, Library books

Weekly Wrap-Up: Explorers

With a new month, we start a new topic. I decided we should learn a bit about explorers. We’ve done this topic before, but there are so many explorers, I figured we’d be able to find something new to study. We’re still starting with So You Want to Be an Explorer? by Judith St. George. The book provides an overview of many explorers from different time periods. There’s not a lot of detail, but it’s a good place to start to find someone you’re interested in.

Another overview book is DK Eyewitness Books: Explorer by Rupert Matthews. This book focuses more on why exploration occurred, moving through the ages. It doesn’t name too many explorers, but it does provide maps of some of the major exploration routes.

If you just want information on European exploration, try The World Made New by Marc Aronson and John W. Glenn. The subtitle lays out what the book is about “Why the age of exploration happened and how it changed the world.”

And finally, if you want more detail about some explorers, try Explorers Who Got Lost by Diane Sansevere-Drehel. This book focuses on explorers who accidentally made big discoveries. The author provides some in-depth descriptions of the lives of the explorers, and their discoveries.

And those were the books we used this week. Linking up with Weird, Unsocialized Homeschoolers’ Weekly Wrap-Up

Weekly-Wrap-UpIf you’re interested in purchasing the books, you can click on the cover image or title to follow an Amazon affiliate link to the book and thanks for supporting my blog!

Leave a comment

Filed under Homeschooling, Library books