Category Archives: Homeschooling

Modern Art Mayhem by Susie Hodge

I found this title when I was searching my library’s catalog for books equivalent to Modern Art in Detail since they’re by the same author. I thought the concept was intriguing and put in a request for the book.

Subtitle: Create Your Own Adventure and Save the Gallery from Disaster! (Art Quest)

Published: 2017

Genre: choose-your-own adventure art book

Length: 48 pages

Setting: an art gallery, present day

Summary: Short version: How well do you know modern art?
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Republic by Plato

I assigned this book to Mr. Curiosity as one of his Great Books of the Ancient World that he’s reading this year. I read the books alongside him so we can discuss the books together.

Translator: G.M.A. Grube, revised by C.D.C. Reeve

Published: originally around 380 BCE; this edition in 1992

Genre: philosophy

Length: 292 pages of text, 300 pages total

Setting: ancient Greece, although no real setting is described Continue reading

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Setting the Records Straight by Lee Binz

I’m not sure how I became aware of this book. I’m sure it caught my eye because Mr. Curiosity is in high school this year and will be going to college eventually. Homeschooling is much more common these days, so it isn’t hard to get a homeschooler into college. It just requires that I keep track of what he’s learning and turn it into a transcript. This book is designed to help me do just that.

Subtitle: How to Craft Homeschool Transcripts and Course Descriptions for College Admission and Scholarships

Published: 2010

Genre: nonfiction homeschooling education

Length: 118 pages of text, 222 pages total Continue reading

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Modern Art in Detail by Susie Hodge

I saw this at the library in the new books section and thought it might work well for our homeschooling. We start each day by looking at and reading some commentary on a piece of art. I typically use an app (DailyArt), but sometimes I like to use a book instead.

Subtitle: 75 Masterpieces

Published: 2017

Genre: art book

Length: 319 pages of text, 335 pages total Continue reading

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Algebra I by Paul A. Foerster

This is the book Mr. Curiosity used for Algebra and Miss Adventure is starting.

Subtitle: Expressions, Equations, and Applications

Published: originally in 1984; my edition in 1999; most recent edition in 2007

Genre: math textbook

Length: 721 pages total, 679 pages of text Continue reading

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Painless Algebra by Lynette Long

This was Mr. Curiosity and Miss Adventure’s introduction to algebra.

Published: my edition is from 2011, but they have a 4th edition published in 2016

Genre: math textbook

Length: 297 pages Continue reading

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What I Will Be Reading #32: Keep Them Coming

I’ve been working down my reading list, but I always manage to add books faster than I take them off. Here’s some new ones I’ve got:

GeekDad is always a good source of books. They had a post recently about space opera series. Just what I need, more series to read, but I do so love a good space opera. I’ve already read the Old Man’s War series, so that cuts six books off the list. I’m most intrigued by the Lost Fleet Series by Jack Campbell, starting with Dauntless, and the Antares series by Michael McCollum, starting with Antares Dawn.

My other big source for books is the Modern Mrs. Darcy. I’ve got two from her this time. I’m in the planning stages for a new year of homeschooling, so my attention went right to The Well-Educated Mind: A Guide to the Classical Education You Never Had by Susan Wise Bauer and Jessie Wise in her post on Books About Books. It’s been on my radar before, but I never got around to it. This time, I requested it right away from the library and I’m reading it right now. It’s quite interesting and I’m thinking about changing things up for homeschooling this year. We’ll see. The other book came from episode 83 of her podcast, and is called How to Read Literature Like a Professor: A Lively and Entertaining Guide to Reading Between the Lines by Thomas Foster. Mr. Curiosity is at the high school level, and I’d like to be able to discuss some literature with him. I’m terrible at finding symbolism or themes or anything like that from books, so I’m hoping this book will help.

My final book addition is more of an author addition, and he’s also useful for homeschooling. I’m always on the lookout for Fun Math activities, and nicoleandmaggie posted some details on how to keep a gifted kid challenged. In that post, they mentioned puzzle books by Martin Gardner. He’s published a number of books, and they should provide me some inspiration for the year!

And those are the books I’m adding to my reading list. Anything look good to you?

If you’re interested in purchasing the book, you can click on the cover image or title to follow an Amazon affiliate link to the book and thanks for supporting my blog!

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Weekly Wrap-Up: Physicists

We’re continuing to learn about physics, splitting out time between physics and physicists. Mr. Curiosity finished How to Teach Quantum Physics to Your Dog and found it hilarious, and full of good physics ideas. Now he knows all about about evil squirrels and bunnies made of cheese. I’ve also had the kids learn about physicists, and here’s the books we’ve used.

I found a graphic novel of Richard Feynman called, appropriately enough Feynman by Jim Ottaviani. The book covers Feynman’s whole life, jumping back and forth to different periods of his life. It’s definitely targeted toward an older crowd. For one thing, there’s the physics and tricky mathematical equations mentioned. For the other, the pages are pretty dense with blocks of talking heads and little action showing on the page. Feynman was an interesting physicist who certainly had a way with words, but it’s not like he did exciting-looking activities.

The other book I found is Headstrong: 52 Women Who Changed Science-and the World by Rachel Swaby. It covers women who made significant contributions in medicine, biology, genetics, physics, geology, astronomy, math, and as inventors. Within each category, the scientists are presented in chronological order. The author devotes three or four pages to each scientist and her breakthrough research, often discussing how the woman had to fight against discrimination to get her voice heard. Miss Adventure is enjoying reading this one. The books reminds people that women have been involved in science just as much as men, even if our achievements are often ignored or co-opted.

And those are the books we used for physics this week. Linking up with Weird, Unsocialized Homeschoolers.

If you’re interested in purchasing the book, you can click on the cover image or title to follow an Amazon affiliate link to the book and thanks for supporting my blog!

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Weekly Wrap-Up: Science Overview Books

My daughter’s gymnastics team is hosting a meet this weekend (Stars and Stripes, a big meet with 1800+ competitors over four days), so I’ve been busy at the convention center all weekend. Team parents are expected to work a couple of sessions to help the whole thing run smoothly. I still have time to review a couple of books, though. I found two interesting science books I want to talk about today:

Let me start with the more general book, The Science Book (Big Ideas Simply Explained) published by DK. DK does some great overview books, so I’m not surprised they are the publisher. This also seems to be one of a series of books focusing on big ideas simply explained (I need to get The Politics Book next for Mr. Curiosity). The book is organized chronologically and for each major scientific breakthrough, you see the chain of observations that lead to the conclusion, what people thought before and after the breakthrough, a biography about the scientist, and some explanatory information. The book has great graphics and is designed for minimal scientific knowledge. It certainly would be an asset to a homeschooling library.

The second book is BODY: A Graphic Guide to Us by Steve Parker and Andrew Baker. As you would expect from the name, each page is a large graphic about a part of the body. The book walks you through the different organ systems and explains how they work with simple graphics. I would just flip open to a page and immediately be drawn into fascinating little details about the body. Miss Adventure spent the entire drive home from the library going, “huh” and then having to read me some tidbit. Be aware that this was published in the UK, so there are some alternate spellings (oesophagus, for example) and the measurements are all in metric.

And those are the new books we flipped through in school this week. Joining up with Weird, Unsocialized Homeschoolers.

If you’re interested in purchasing the book, you can click on the cover image or title to follow an Amazon affiliate link to the book and thanks for supporting my blog!

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Weekly Wrap-Up: Explorers

With a new month, we start a new topic. I decided we should learn a bit about explorers. We’ve done this topic before, but there are so many explorers, I figured we’d be able to find something new to study. We’re still starting with So You Want to Be an Explorer? by Judith St. George. The book provides an overview of many explorers from different time periods. There’s not a lot of detail, but it’s a good place to start to find someone you’re interested in.

Another overview book is DK Eyewitness Books: Explorer by Rupert Matthews. This book focuses more on why exploration occurred, moving through the ages. It doesn’t name too many explorers, but it does provide maps of some of the major exploration routes.

If you just want information on European exploration, try The World Made New by Marc Aronson and John W. Glenn. The subtitle lays out what the book is about “Why the age of exploration happened and how it changed the world.”

And finally, if you want more detail about some explorers, try Explorers Who Got Lost by Diane Sansevere-Drehel. This book focuses on explorers who accidentally made big discoveries. The author provides some in-depth descriptions of the lives of the explorers, and their discoveries.

And those were the books we used this week. Linking up with Weird, Unsocialized Homeschoolers’ Weekly Wrap-Up

Weekly-Wrap-UpIf you’re interested in purchasing the books, you can click on the cover image or title to follow an Amazon affiliate link to the book and thanks for supporting my blog!

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