King of Tokyo birthday party

Things have been a bit out of sorts on the blog this past week. Not only did we go camping for five days, but when we came back I had two days to get ready for Mr. Curiosity’s birthday party. I got inspired one day and thought to do a full-sized version of King of Tokyo . The basic premise of the board game is you’re a monster destroying Tokyo. Perfect – the kids can create a monster that they’ll play in the game. I just needed to super-size all the elements to the game, with Mr. Curiosity’s help.

First things first – the dice – they’re about an inch square. photo(10)

Mr. Curiosity painted the base colors, but I put the symbols on each since he had a hard time with the fine paintwork.

Then we needed something to represent Tokyo City and Tokyo Bay.

Only Tokyo is used with up to four players.

Only Tokyo is used with up to four players.

We needed Tokyo Bay if five or six were playing.

We needed Tokyo Bay if five or six were playing.

Again, Mr. Curiosity painted the bases. I just did the lettering.

Then we needed to make monsters. I decided small cardboard boxes as heads for decorating, and then chestplates for hearts, names, and storage for stars and energy cubes. The heads would need a base level of decoration, so we got out the spray paint and Mr. Curiosity had some fun.

The painted head, ready for decoration

The painted heads, ready for decoration

Now, we were ready for kids to add some accoutrements. I raided my stash of craft supplies and found all kinds of goodies, like:

Some supplies include aluminum foil, pipe cleaners, random odds and ends, cardboard pieces and box rivets

Some supplies include aluminum foil, pipe cleaners, random odds and ends, cardboard pieces and box rivets

We also had popsicle sticks, markers, beads, and felt.

We also had popsicle sticks, markers, beads, and felt.

Since we were working under a short time frame, we used hot glue guns to attach everything. I gave a quick lecture on how to use them safely and let the kids have at it.

Look at the concentration on their faces.

Look at the concentration on their faces.

Once the heads were done, the kids worked on chestplates. They needed a place for their monster’s name and ten hearts.

photo(14)We used baggies stapled to the bottom to hold candy stars and poker chip energy cubes. Plus, I cut up a couple of nine-pocket sleeve pages to hold cards.

Radioactive Medusa's as a finished monster

Radioactive Medusa’s as a finished monster

Once the monsters were made, they could play the game. The making took a while, so we only got one game in. Mr. Curiosity managed to win on stars.

Making monster faces

Making monster faces

Needless to say, much fun was had by all!

Weekly-Wrap-Up

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