A Bridge Across the Ocean by Susan Meissner

This was one of the spring SheReads book choices. I was provided a copy of the book, but all my opinions are my own.

Published: 2017

Genre: fiction

Length: 368 pages

Setting: California, present day, and Europe, 1944-1946 Continue reading

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Wolfy Things by Erin Roberts

This is the next short story in the Event Horizon 2017 collection of short stories highlighting authors who are eligible for the 2017 Campbell award for best new writer.

Published: August, 2016 in Podcastle

Genre: shapeshifter fantasy

Setting: down South, present day Continue reading

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Recommended Science books

I like to read science nonfiction books – they feed my inner scientist. Sometimes it’s hard to pick out the really interesting books from the “you’ll only love it if you’re already a fan of the topic.” Today, I thought I’d put together a post of some of my favorite science books. All these books fall into the “fascinating” category. Be careful  – you’ll want to share random bits of information with your nearest friends and relatives.

If you click on the title, you’ll be taken to my original review. If you click on the cover photo, you’ll be taken to an Amazon page where you can buy the book yourself (and thanks for supporting my blog!).

The Disappearing Spoon: And Other True Tales of Madness, Love, and the History of the World from the Periodic Table of the Elements by Sam Kean

Here’s your first book full of tidbits. In this case, it’s all about the periodic table of the elements. You get everything from how the periodic table was put together to the discovery of elements, both natural and synthetic. My favorite part was discussing the origin of element names.

Packing for Mars: The Curious Science of Life in the Void by Mary Roach

I like pretty much every book Mary Roach has written. In this case, she’s writing about long-term stays in space. This is even more appropriate now since there are several organizations working on sending people to Mars. A trip to Mars will involve a new series of issues, and Roach discusses many of those issues in this book. She’s not afraid to discuss any bodily function, either, so don’t be surprised by the topics covered!

A Demon in the Freezer by Richard Preston

Let’s bring the books back to Earth, but still stay timely. This is the oldest book in the list, and it was inspired by the anthrax attacks in 2001. The book is all about smallpox. While smallpox has been eradicated from the wild, it still exists in at least a couple of labs and could be used to create a biological weapon if the wrong group gets a hold of it.

Feathers: The Evolution of a Natural Miracle by Thor Hanson

This is my submission for the single topic science book. You know what you’re going to get when you pick up the book – it’s all about feathers. However, the author does a great job of alternating between how birds and humans use feathers. There’s also a bit on the evolution of feathers, that probably needs an update by now, but is still interesting.

Anything sound good to you? Anything you think I should add to the list? Let me know in the comments!

If you’re interested in purchasing the book, you can click on the cover image to follow an Amazon affiliate link to the book and thanks for supporting my blog!

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A Dragonfly in Amber by Diana Gabaldon

This is the second Outlander book. I’m rereading the series this year, and I wanted to be sure to read the book before I got around to watching the second season of the TV series.

Published: 1992

Genre: time travel/historical fiction

Length: 743 pages

Setting: France and Scotland, 1740s, Inverness, 1968 Continue reading

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Mission Control, This Is Apollo by Andrew Chaikin

Tomorrow is our last meeting of American History Club for the school year. We’re doing a second session on the space program. It’s surprisingly difficult to find a YA level book about astronauts/the space program/space race. I ended up choosing a nonfiction book instead of our usual fiction or narrative-driven nonfiction book because that’s all I could find in our library system.

Subtitle: The Story of the First Voyages to the Moon

Published: 2009

Genre: nonfiction history

Length: 105 pages of text, 114 pages total Continue reading

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Blue Moon by Laurell K. Hamilton

This is the eighth book in the Anita Blake: Vampire Hunter series I read in a previous year (previous decade at this point!).

Published: 1998

Genre: urban fantasy/romance

Length: 418 pages

Setting: mostly Tennessee, shortly after the events of Burnt Offerings Continue reading

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The ZOMBEE Project by Allison Mulder

This is the next short story in the Event Horizon 2017 collection of short stories highlighting authors who are eligible for the 2017 Campbell award for best new writer.

Published: March 2, 2017 in EscapePod (you can either read or listen to the story for free at the link)

Genre: science fiction

Setting: near future, the United States Continue reading

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