White Night by Jim Butcher

This is the ninth book in the Dresden Files series I’m making an effort to finish this year. There’s 15 books in the series, though, so we’ll see if I finish the series this year or not.

Published: 2007

Genre: urban fantasy

Length: 404 pages

Font: Janson

Setting: Chicago, present day, a year after the events of Proven Guilty Continue reading

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Looking for Gordo by Robert J. Sawyer

This is the next story in the Future Visions anthology, by someone I’ve never even heard of. Turns out the two authors are known for their comics and illustrations, which explains my lack of knowledge.

Published: 2015

Genre: science fiction

Setting: California, 2030s
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Weekly Wrap-Up: Bill of Rights

For the month of February, we’re learning about the Bill of Rights. Last year we learned about the Constitution, so we’re sticking with the theme and doing the Bill of Rights. Seems a rather important topic with all the news these days.

Mr. Curiosity is reading Our Constitution by Donald Ritchie. It’s a project of the Annenberg Foundation Trust, whose website we’ve used for videos on the Constitution and Bill of Rights. The book does describe and explain the parts of the Constitution, but it also goes through each of the amendments. For each amendment, the book states the amendment, explains what it means, and then provides some key Supreme Court cases addressing the amendment. It’s definitely meant for an older audience (at least middle school) since it is more in depth and could overwhelm a younger child.

That’s why Miss Adventure is reading The Bill of Rights by Karen Price Hossell. The book starts out by discussing historical documents and how they are preserved. It then goes into the creation of the Bill of Rights and it’s ratification. This book is more appropriate for younger audiences, with one topic for every two-page spread.

Another option for Miss Adventure to read is Constitution Translated for Kids by Cathy Travis. Again, it covers the whole Constitution, including all the amendments, instead of just focusing on the Bill of Rights. Each page is broken into two columns. For each part of the Constitution, the original words are printed in the left column, and an explanation of the words is printed in the right column.

And those are the books we are using to learn about Bill of Rights. Linking up with Weird, Unsocialized Homeschooler’s Weekly Wrap-up.

f you’re interested in purchasing the book, you can click on the cover image or title to follow an Amazon affiliate link to the book and thanks for supporting my blog!

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The Golden Buddha by Clive Cussler and Craig Dirgo

Picked this book up as an audio book for a couple of car trips a few years ago. Cussler is always a fun and safe bet. It’s the first book in the Oregon Files series.

Published: 2003

Genre: thriller

Length: 527 pages

Setting: Cuba and Tibet, present day Continue reading

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Still Life by Louise Penny

This was chosen as our next book club reading. I vaguely remember hearing about the series (it’s the first book in the Chief Inspector Gamache series) on What Should I Read Next as being awesome, but that’s all I knew about it going into the book.

Published: 2005

Genre: murder mystery

Length: 312 pages

Setting: Three Pines, near Montreal, Quebec, present day Continue reading

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Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children by Ransom Riggs

I’ve seen this book mentioned positively numerous places and finally picked it up from the library.

Published: 2011

Genre: YA urban fantasy

Length: 352 pages

Setting: mostly Cairnholm, Wales, in the present day and 1940 Continue reading

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Short stories by Bogi Takacs

These stories were included in the 2014 Campbellian Anthology.

Recordings of a More Personal Nature

Published: November 2013 in Apex Magazine

Genre: fantasy

Setting: the Temple of some other world

Summary: Access to the Archives has suddenly become difficult. This is causing problems in completing administrative and political tasks. Archivists like Idriwu, who grew up accessing the Archives and therefore have part of their personalities within the Archive, are distraught to lose the connection. Even with aides (like drugs), access is becoming more difficult. Idriwu comes up with the idea of writing down the Archives so the information is still available when access to the Archives ends.

Final thoughts: An interesting concept that the culture would never have developed writing because they have perfect oral transmission of information via the Archive and the archivists. It certainly gives members of the Temple power, but no more than would be obtained if those were the only people who could read and write. I can’t believe any one person would be able to come up with a system of writing in a short time period, even starting with some rudimentary signs.

Title comes from: The assistant to Idriwu made the argument that the archivists should be allowed to make written recordings of their lives spent in the Archive as well as matters of state and history.

Mouse Choirs of the Old Matra

Published: July 2013 in Demeter’s Spicebox

Genre: fairy tale

Setting: the island plains in a distant past

Summary: A wise wizard who lives on the island plains makes friends with a mouse one day. When he feeds the mouse, she turns into a young maiden. The maiden decides to live with the wizard and they spend many happy days together. One day, the maiden decides she wants to marry, but only the best of the best. So, the wizard climbs on his trusty steed and looks to find the best of the best.

Final thoughts: This was a sweet story that followed a very traditional arc. I wasn’t surprised at any point in the story, which made it feel like I’d read it before, or at least something very similar.

Title comes from: When the maiden married, the mouse choirs sang for days under the mountain called Old Matra.

 

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